Research

Dennis, Alan R and Reinicke, Bryan A. “Beta versus VHS and the Acceptance of Electronic Brainstorming Technology.” MIS Quarterly, http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048 (accessed February 7, 2011).

(This article discussed briefly the video war between Betamax and VHS.  It also compares and contrast brainstorming techniques such as paper brainstorming vs. electronic brainstorming.)

Lim, Dennis. “Instant Nostalgia? Let’s Go to the Videotape,” New York Times; http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048 (accessed February 7, 2011).

(This article discusses the history and the nostalgia of the VHS.  It also discusses the DVD which eventually made the VHS obsolete.)

Ginsburg, Charles P. LabGuy’s World: THE BIRTH OF VIDEO RECORDING. January 9, 2005. http://www.labguysworld.com/VTR_BirthOf.htm (accessed February 8, 2011).

(This is a paper, at the 82nd Convention of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (S.M.P.T.E.) on October 5, 1957, 18 months after Ampex demonstrated the world’s first practical television video tape recorder.)

Laday, Jason. “VHS Named History Milestone,” The Institute, http://www.ieee.org/portal/site/tionline/menuitem (accessed February 8, 2011)

(This article also discusses the invention of the VHS and how the VHS gave people the ability to watch newly released movies from the comfort of their living rooms.)

Thibodeaux, Wanda Marie. “Negative and Positive Impact of Video Cassettes.” http://www.ehow.co.uk/about_5480994_negative-positive-impact-video-cassettes.html (accessed February 9, 2011)

(This article looks at the positive and negative impacts of the video cassette had during its existence.)

No Author. “The History of Video and Related Inventions,” http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blvideo.htm (accessed February 7, 2011)

(This short article deals briefly with the VTR and its inventor Charles Ginsburg.)

No Author. “Charles Ginsburg,” Inventor of the Week Archive, http://inventors.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm (accessed February 9, 2011)

(This article focuses on Charles Ginsburg.  Ginsburg invented the VTR, an important antecedent that lead to the eventually creation of the VHS.)

No Author. “VCR,” Digital America, http://www.ce.org/Press/CEA_Pubs/941.asp (accessed February 9, 2011).

(This sources examines the history of the VCR and VHS by looking at the men who created it and its transition into the United States from Japan.)

Gray, Valerie Lynn. “Going Digital,” Black Enterprise, http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048 (accessed February 9, 2011)

(This source presents a guide to the modernizing of one’s home-theater system through video equipment and components of a home theater system.)

Yule, Valerie; “Take Home Video for Adult Literacy,” International Review of Education, http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048 (accessed February 7, 2011)

(This article looks at the impact the VHS had on at home education, allowing for adults and adolescents to learn using VHS technology in the comfort of their own homes.)

Greenburg, Joshua M. From Betamax to Blockbuster. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2008.

(This book looks primarily at the life of Sony’s Betamax format tapes.  Despite the fact that it focuses on Betamax while the blog is focuses on VHS, it gives good insight and explanations to why VHS defeated Betamax in the Formatting Wars.)

Discvoery Channel. “Tony Curtis On Arrival of Vcr.” History.com. http://www.history.com/audio/tony-curtis-on-arrival-of-vcr#tony-curtis-on-arrival-of-vcr (accessed March 30, 2011).

(This website contains a recording of an interview with actor Tony Curtis in 1971.  In this interview Tony Curtis briefly discusses the introduction of the VHS and cassette tapes and the impact they will have on the movie industry.)

Unknown, “It’s Unreel: Dvd Rentals Overtake Videocassettes,” Washington Times, 20 June 2003. http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2003/jun/20/20030620-113258-1104r/ (accessed March 30, 2011).

(This article from the Washington Post discusses the fading out of VHS and cassette tapes due to the new innovations of the DVD.  The dates it provides show how long VHS format was around in the U.S., and from it one can see how much the DVD format has changed in its short existence.)

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